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SIDA : SWACH evaluation Rajasthan, India : final report

The Integrated Sanitation, Water, Guineaworm Control, and Community Health Project (SWACH) aims to improve the supply of safe drinking water, upgrade operation and maintenance of water supply facilities, establish a process of continuous health education and reduce Guineaworm infestations through improved domestic and environmental sanitation. The evaluation reports that investment in safe drinking water constituted 70 - 80 per cent of project costs. Concentration of resources on the eradication of Guineaworm has apparently led to the neglect of other waterborne diseases. Apart from these two topics, the evaluation covers the human resource development component, issues of gender (including women handpumps mechanics and women's groups), personnel management of the project and the use of social marketing in mobilising the community. The report closes with the findings of a participatory rural appraisal in 10 villages.

TitleSIDA : SWACH evaluation Rajasthan, India : final report
Publication TypeMiscellaneous
Year of Publication1994
AuthorsCentre for Development Studies -Swansea, GB
Pagination2 vol. (xiv, 135 p. ; 114 p.): 16 tab.
Date Published1994-01-01
PublisherUniversity of Wales, Centre for Development Studies
Place PublishedSwansea, UK
Keywordscab94/1, case studies, community participation, cost benefit analysis, costs, disease control, dracontiasis, evaluation, gender, hand pumps, health education, india rajasthan, maintenance, manpower development, projects, rural areas, sanitation, social marketing, water supply, women
Abstract

The Integrated Sanitation, Water, Guineaworm Control, and Community Health Project (SWACH) aims to improve the supply of safe drinking water, upgrade operation and maintenance of water supply facilities, establish a process of continuous health education and reduce Guineaworm infestations through improved domestic and environmental sanitation. The evaluation reports that investment in safe drinking water constituted 70 - 80 per cent of project costs. Concentration of resources on the eradication of Guineaworm has apparently led to the neglect of other waterborne diseases. Apart from these two topics, the evaluation covers the human resource development component, issues of gender (including women handpumps mechanics and women's groups), personnel management of the project and the use of social marketing in mobilising the community. The report closes with the findings of a participatory rural appraisal in 10 villages.

NotesContents: [Main report]. - Bibliography (5 p.) ; Appendices 1-15. - Draft.
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