Skip to main content

Part of a larger research project to evaluate the outcome of institutional reforms in different sectors, this study looks at the water and public health sectors in Ghana.

TitleThe opinions of health and water service users in Ghana
Publication TypeBook
Year of Publication1996
AuthorsRakodi, C.
Secondary TitleThe role of government in adjusting economies
Volumeno. 10
Paginationvii, 50 p. : 4 tab.
Date Published1996-08-01
PublisherUniversity of Birmingham, School of Public Policy
Place PublishedBirmingham, UK
ISBN Number0704417162
Keywordsaccess to water, attitudes, cab97/2, ghana accra, ghana ashanti region kumasi, health care, research, safe water supply, urban areas, water authorities, willingness to pay
Abstract

Part of a larger research project to evaluate the outcome of institutional reforms in different sectors, this study looks at the water and public health sectors in Ghana. It is based on focus group discussions which were held in eleven locations in Accra and Kumasi in January 1996. They included socially representative groups of low and middle income residents, and sought information on user behaviour, experience with and opinions of current service provision, and suggestions for future reform.

Within the built-up areas of Accra and Kumasi residents almost invariably rely on piped water supplied by the semi-autonomous Ghana Water and Sewerage Corporation (GWSC), but many middle and most low income households share a tap and many have to purchase water by the bucket from those with a tap, at prices considerably in excess of the metered cost. Irregular supply and shortages are common, especially in Accra, and levels of dissatisfaction are high.

GWSC's mode of operation is top-down and technocratic. Although improved cost recovery may have been achieved through changes to administrative procedures, residents are unhappy that this has not been accompanied by a more reliable and better quality service. Because of problems associated with public standpipes, a decision has been taken to phase them out. However, low income residents are unable to pay for individual connections and some expressed a preference for community standpipes as an alternative to purchase of water from those with taps, so the decision may be premature.

Notes41 ref.
Custom 1202.2, 824

Locations

Etiquetas o tags

Back to
the top