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Community-based development in water and sanitation projects : supporting community-driven development in developing member countries

This study undertakes a comparative analysis of a sample of community-driven development (CDD) and community-based development (CBD) projects and between CDD and CBD and non-CDD projects in water supply and sanitation. It is based on a sample of nine projects in Indonesia, Nepal, and the Philippines. The study found that CDD: is a more cost-effective mode of delivery of international donor funding for rural infrastructure projects; presents a more responsive approach to local community infrastructure demands, generating increased benefits; instills a sense of ownership that translates to better O&M and increased sustainability; provides a fund disbursement mechanism that promotes transparency and limits leakages; and results in projects with higher rates of return than ADB sector projects. Five interesting results were generated: CDD projects do not take significantly more time from appraisal through implementation to closure; CDD projects do not result in more time or cost overruns; Projects with more CDD elements tended to be more successful; CDD projects in the sample showed a lower per-capita cost for the water supply infrastructure intervention; and CDD projects were more likely to realize a per-capita cost. Based on the findings, the study formulates recommendations for the design, implementation and promotion of CDD projects funded by ADB.

TitleCommunity-based development in water and sanitation projects : supporting community-driven development in developing member countries
Publication TypeBook
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsHill, D.
Paginationix, 94 p. : 9 tab.
Date Published2009-01-01
PublisherAsian Development Bank
Place PublishedManila, Philippines
ISSN Number9789715618588
Keywordscommunity management, evaluation, financing, indonesia, monitoring, nepal, philippines, projects, rural areas, sanitation, sdiasi, sdipar, triple s harmonisation, WASHCost, water supply
Abstract

This study undertakes a comparative analysis of a sample of community-driven development (CDD) and community-based development (CBD) projects and between CDD and CBD and non-CDD projects in water supply and sanitation. It is based on a sample of nine projects in Indonesia, Nepal, and the Philippines. The study found that CDD: is a more cost-effective mode of delivery of international donor funding for rural infrastructure projects; presents a more responsive approach to local community infrastructure demands, generating increased benefits; instills a sense of ownership that translates to better O&M and increased sustainability; provides a fund disbursement mechanism that promotes transparency and limits leakages; and results in projects with higher rates of return than ADB sector projects. Five interesting results were generated: CDD projects do not take significantly more time from appraisal through implementation to closure; CDD projects do not result in more time or cost overruns; Projects with more CDD elements tended to be more successful; CDD projects in the sample showed a lower per-capita cost for the water supply infrastructure intervention; and CDD projects were more likely to realize a per-capita cost. Based on the findings, the study formulates recommendations for the design, implementation and promotion of CDD projects funded by ADB.

NotesBibliography: p. 29-33
Custom 1822, 305.1, 205.1

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