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Combined household water treatment and indoor air pollution projects in urban Mambanda, Cameroon and rural Nyanza, Kenya : report of a mission to Mambanda, Cameroon and Nyanza, Kenya, carried out from 10 to 18 December 2009

In 2007, the World Health Organization (WHO) issued a request for proposals (RFP) on the integration of Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) and Household Water Treatment (HWT) at the household level in Africa. Globally, the burden of ill‐health in Africa due to unsafe drinking water, inadequate sanitation and polluted indoor air stands out prominently. Among African children under 5 years of age, 18% of all deaths are due to diarrhoea, and 17% to pneumonia. Around 40% of these pneumonia deaths can be attributed to indoor air pollution, and approximately 88% of diarrhoea deaths to inadequate water, sanitation, and hygiene. [authors abstract]

TitleCombined household water treatment and indoor air pollution projects in urban Mambanda, Cameroon and rural Nyanza, Kenya : report of a mission to Mambanda, Cameroon and Nyanza, Kenya, carried out from 10 to 18 December 2009
Publication TypeMiscellaneous
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsShaheed, A., Bruce, N.
Pagination79 p. : 3 boxes, 17 fig., 13 tab.
Date Published2011-01-01
PublisherWorld Health Organization (WHO)
Place PublishedGeneva, Switzerland
Keywordscameroon douala, cooking stoves, health impact, interviews, kenya nyanza, literature reviews, sdiafr, sdihyg, water supply, water treatment
Abstract

In 2007, the World Health Organization (WHO) issued a request for proposals (RFP) on the integration of Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) and Household Water Treatment (HWT) at the household level in Africa. Globally, the burden of ill‐health in Africa due to unsafe drinking water, inadequate sanitation and polluted indoor air stands out prominently. Among African children under 5 years of age, 18% of all deaths are due to diarrhoea, and 17% to pneumonia. Around 40% of these pneumonia deaths can be attributed to indoor air pollution, and approximately 88% of diarrhoea deaths to inadequate water, sanitation, and hygiene. [authors abstract]

NotesIncludes references
Custom 1824