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Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) for people in vulnerable situations : identifying and supporting the most disadvantaged people in CLTS : a case study of Bangladesh

Bangladesh is one of the poorest countries in the world with a large number of people still living without improved sanitation. However, despite this, it is still on course to meet its Millennium Development Goal (MDG) on sanitation, largely due to the success of Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) in rural areas. CLTS involves facilitating a process to inspire and empower rural communities to stop open defecation and to build and use latrines. It uses participatory methodologies to develop awareness of the risks of open defecation and facilitate community self-analysis of their health and sanitation status. Its aim is to „ignite‟ communities to cease open defecation and commence toilet construction using local materials. CLTS has been recognised by the United Nations as one of the most effective approaches to promoting sanitation and achieving the MDGs for sanitation. Despite the significant impact CLTS has had in Bangladesh, as with all development initiatives, it is confronted with the social realities that characterise communities. One of these challenges concerns the inclusion within the CLTS process of what this study refers to as „people in vulnerable situations‟, who face particular challenges. Several recent studies have suggested that people in particularly vulnerable situations are often neglected and/or have difficulties participating in CLTS for a variety of reasons. This idea has been met with some criticism as it devalues the ability of CLTS as a method to assist the poorest people. [authors abstract]

TitleCommunity-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) for people in vulnerable situations : identifying and supporting the most disadvantaged people in CLTS : a case study of Bangladesh
Publication TypeMiscellaneous
Year of Publication2010
AuthorsFawzi, A., Jones, H.
Pagination9 p. : 1 box; 2 photographs
Date Published2010-09-01
PublisherWaterAid
Place PublishedLondon, UK
Keywordsaccess to sanitation, behaviour, health education, household hygiene, latrines, sdihyg, subsidies, WASHCost
Abstract

Bangladesh is one of the poorest countries in the world with a large number of people still living without improved sanitation. However, despite this, it is still on course to meet its Millennium Development Goal (MDG) on sanitation, largely due to the success of Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) in rural areas. CLTS involves facilitating a process to inspire and empower rural communities to stop open defecation and to build and use latrines. It uses participatory methodologies to develop awareness of the risks of open defecation and facilitate community self-analysis of their health and sanitation status. Its aim is to „ignite‟ communities to cease open defecation and commence toilet construction using local materials. CLTS has been recognised by the United Nations as one of the most effective approaches to promoting sanitation and achieving the MDGs for sanitation. Despite the significant impact CLTS has had in Bangladesh, as with all development initiatives, it is confronted with the social realities that characterise communities. One of these challenges concerns the inclusion within the CLTS process of what this study refers to as „people in vulnerable situations‟, who face particular challenges. Several recent studies have suggested that people in particularly vulnerable situations are often neglected and/or have difficulties participating in CLTS for a variety of reasons. This idea has been met with some criticism as it devalues the ability of CLTS as a method to assist the poorest people. [authors abstract]

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