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Assessing people’s views of infrastructure : methodologies to study urban shared sanitation

Providing sanitation services in low-income areas in fast-growing cities is a significant challenge for urban planners, donors and governments. Making these services sustainable by answering the needs of heterogeneous urban population is a major step to meet this challenge. This paper shows the necessity of exploring users’ views when planning sanitation facilities on low-income and high-density settlements. An initial desk based study highlights the multi-disciplinary components of urban sanitation projects and the central role played by the facilities’ users. Focusing on shared sanitation facilities, the users’ needs and perceptions are at the crossroad of the different dimensions of sustainability. Bringing together assessment practices from social science, engineering
and economics leads to new methodologies able to take a multi-dimensional picture of people’s practices and needs. [authors abstract]

TitleAssessing people’s views of infrastructure : methodologies to study urban shared sanitation
Publication TypeMiscellaneous
Year of Publication2010
AuthorsMazeau, A.P., Reed, B.
Pagination8 p.; 2 tab.; 2 fig.
Date Published2010-05-31
PublisherS.n.
Place PublishedS.l.
Keywordsaccess to sanitation, developing countries, low-income communities, people, sanitation, sanitation services, slum upgrading, sustainable development, urban areas, urban communities
Abstract

Providing sanitation services in low-income areas in fast-growing cities is a significant challenge for urban planners, donors and governments. Making these services sustainable by answering the needs of heterogeneous urban population is a major step to meet this challenge. This paper shows the necessity of exploring users’ views when planning sanitation facilities on low-income and high-density settlements. An initial desk based study highlights the multi-disciplinary components of urban sanitation projects and the central role played by the facilities’ users. Focusing on shared sanitation facilities, the users’ needs and perceptions are at the crossroad of the different dimensions of sustainability. Bringing together assessment practices from social science, engineering
and economics leads to new methodologies able to take a multi-dimensional picture of people’s practices and needs. [authors abstract]

NotesWith references on p. 7 - 8
Custom 1302.1