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Ecosystem services and poverty reduction : how do development practitioners conceptualize the linkages?

While there is an impressive amount of research – theoretical propositions as well as empirical results – focusing on how ecosystem services can contribute to poverty reduction and resilience, it is less clear how this knowledge is operationalized and applied among development agencies and development practitioners. This article investigates this by using the Swedish International Development Agency, Sida, as an illustrative case study comparing how the link between ecosystem services and poverty reduction is conceptualized at different levels within the organization, and also the extent to which those conceptualizations correspond to an ‘ideal’ conceptualization, that is, using the global Millennium Ecosystem Assessment as a baseline. The results indicate that ecosystem services first and foremost are perceived as a crucial input for economic development, but linkages between ecosystems and issues of security, health and empowerment are to some extent also recognised. [authors abstract]

TitleEcosystem services and poverty reduction : how do development practitioners conceptualize the linkages?
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsSjöstedt, M.
Paginationp. 777 - 787
Date Published2012-11-28
PublisherEuropean Association of Development Research and Training Institutes
Place PublishedGeneva, Switzerland
Keywordsdevelopment aid, ecology, ecosystems, poverty
Abstract

While there is an impressive amount of research – theoretical propositions as well as empirical results – focusing on how ecosystem services can contribute to poverty reduction and resilience, it is less clear how this knowledge is operationalized and applied among development agencies and development practitioners. This article investigates this by using the Swedish International Development Agency, Sida, as an illustrative case study comparing how the link between ecosystem services and poverty reduction is conceptualized at different levels within the organization, and also the extent to which those conceptualizations correspond to an ‘ideal’ conceptualization, that is, using the global Millennium Ecosystem Assessment as a baseline. The results indicate that ecosystem services first and foremost are perceived as a crucial input for economic development, but linkages between ecosystems and issues of security, health and empowerment are to some extent also recognised. [authors abstract]

NotesBibliography on p. 785 - 787
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