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Analysing productive use of domestic water and wastewater for urban livelihoods of the poor : a study from Accra, Ghana : a paper presented at the I...

Using Accra as an example, the paper records the different urban livelihood activities that utilize domestic water/wastewater, quantifies such use and presents a framework for planning multiple uses in an urban context. The paper provides insights to city planners, water authorities, and researchers on the wide range of ‘other uses’ that urban domestic water supply and wastewater is utilized for and how to quantify such use. From preliminary findings we conclude that the interests of people who use domestic water for livelihood purposes can be better accounted for under conditions of improved access, which will reduce the price they pay for water and increase their profit margin. The constraining factor for making productive use of water is not so much water shortage, as inequity of water access in the city. In the case of wastewater, managing the risk is essential for ensuring sustainability of these livelihoods. [authors abstract]

TitleAnalysing productive use of domestic water and wastewater for urban livelihoods of the poor : a study from Accra, Ghana : a paper presented at the I...
Publication TypeConference Paper
Year of Publication2008
AuthorsRaschid-Sally, L., Rooijen, D. van, Abraham, E.
Pagination10 p.; 2 fig.; 2 tab.; 1 box
Date Published2008-11-04
PublisherS.n.
Place PublishedS.l.
Keywordsdomestic use, ghana accra, multiple-use of water, sustainable livelihoods
Abstract

Using Accra as an example, the paper records the different urban livelihood activities that utilize domestic water/wastewater, quantifies such use and presents a framework for planning multiple uses in an urban context. The paper provides insights to city planners, water authorities, and researchers on the wide range of ‘other uses’ that urban domestic water supply and wastewater is utilized for and how to quantify such use. From preliminary findings we conclude that the interests of people who use domestic water for livelihood purposes can be better accounted for under conditions of improved access, which will reduce the price they pay for water and increase their profit margin. The constraining factor for making productive use of water is not so much water shortage, as inequity of water access in the city. In the case of wastewater, managing the risk is essential for ensuring sustainability of these livelihoods. [authors abstract]

NotesWith bibliography on p. 9 - 10
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