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Monitoring the costs of WASH contracts for unit cost analyses and improved transparency (Symposium 2013)

One of the components to monitor of WASH Services is the cost. WASHCost in Mozambique has been working to obtain cost data by using existing reporting structures and feeding the results directly back to people participating in providing data. Over the years, WASHCost has succeeded in obtaining, analysing and disseminating sector contract data in more than four cycles of action research. Discussed is how the action research cycle data feeds into sector debates, such as budgeting and sector financing. By analyses of the evolution of the process, the strength and weaknesses are brought forward. It is shown that there is scope for widening the process to include small town systems and sanitation, but that care needs to be taken to keep the data as simple as possible. The desire to disaggregate needs to be balanced with the difficulties of obtaining meaningful information from sufficient contracts and interventions. The paper concludes with the specific challenges to use this data for transparency purposes. [authors abstract]

TitleMonitoring the costs of WASH contracts for unit cost analyses and improved transparency (Symposium 2013)
Publication TypeConference Paper
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsNaafs, A., Zita, J.
Pagination10 p.; 3 fig.; 3 tab.; 2 boxes
Date Published2013-04-09
PublisherWASHCost team, Maputo, MZ
Place PublishedMaputo, Mozambique
Keywordscosts, data analysis, monitoring, mozambique, water, sanitation and hygiene [WASH]
Abstract

One of the components to monitor of WASH Services is the cost. WASHCost in Mozambique has been working to obtain cost data by using existing reporting structures and feeding the results directly back to people participating in providing data. Over the years, WASHCost has succeeded in obtaining, analysing and disseminating sector contract data in more than four cycles of action research. Discussed is how the action research cycle data feeds into sector debates, such as budgeting and sector financing. By analyses of the evolution of the process, the strength and weaknesses are brought forward. It is shown that there is scope for widening the process to include small town systems and sanitation, but that care needs to be taken to keep the data as simple as possible. The desire to disaggregate needs to be balanced with the difficulties of obtaining meaningful information from sufficient contracts and interventions. The paper concludes with the specific challenges to use this data for transparency purposes. [authors abstract]

Notes

With list of references on p. 10

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